Spotting Superman Blue in the Black

Spotting Superman Blue in the Black



You know, every once in a while, it hits me that Frank Black really oughtta write the occasional superhero comic:

Billy Radcliffe didn’t go to town
And when we looked up
He was looking right down
Catching blue in his eyes that were brown
Billy Radcliffe
(Billy Radcliffe)

Billy Radcliffe owned by the state
From his first breath
To the cemetery gate
He was the first boy born in space
Billy Radcliffe
(Billy Radcliffe)

Billy Radcliffe very first one
He really had lived just a cursed son
A split in half man sang the cherubim
Billy Radcliffe
(Billy Radcliffe)

Billy Radcliffe saw what the Devil man he saw
He saw a spot of blue in black of the eye of the Lord Such a cruel love
Is the kind that has wrought oh Billy
Billy Radcliffe

Billy sadly didn’t live long
He had to stay there
Because he wasn’t too strong
He’s stepping out the door
Blowing up like bomb
Billy Radcliffe
(Billy Radcliffe)

Billy Radcliffe very first one
Really a hatched man a light switch son
A split in half man sang the cherubim

Billy Radcliffe very first one
A split in half man sang the cherubim
I bet you cried when he died now didja
Now didja ?

Now Billy Radcliffe saw what the Devil man he saw
He saw a spot of blue in black of the eye of the Lord Oh Billy
Billy Radcliffe saw what the Devil man had
And I feel very bad for
William Radcliffe


Of course–he’s pretty busy…

One thing I do know for sure–there is no better soundtrack for Grant Morrison’s work than a Black album (although I would be remiss if I failed to mention here that sometime-commenter Joe has argued that wonderful things can result from the combination of Animal Man and Tool’s Lateralus–I plan to test out his theory this semester…)

Also–over on Comic Book Politics, I waded into the problem of reading Watchmen allegorically (violently opposed–in a nice way, of course!–by Marc Singer and Steven Berg) by suggesting that:


I’m no more a fan of [this kind of reading] than Marc or Steven are, but I think that, in this particular case, the work almost begs for it! It’s kind of the Magic Mountain of superhero comics… but here’s the thing: if you pursue my analogy, Dreibeg & Juspeczyk (you left her out!) become a kind of dual-Hans Castorp… not stand-ins for any philosophy, but protean figures stranded in the labyrinth of allegories that Moore builds around them “while they were sleeping”, as it were…

now, what do we do with that assertion? (assuming that people don’t just discard it out of hand)–well, I’m not sure…but I’ll know more in a few weeks!

Whaddya think?

Over on my own courseblog, I’m still setting the stage for the discussions to come, with some good old-fashioned nods toward Plato, Anne Hutchinson, Jonathan Edwards, and the general direction of The Sublime. (I like to think that these will at least make a modicum of sense to the fine people who endured my two frantic lectures this week!)

Happy MLK Day (in advance) Friends!

Dave

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One comment

  1. I don’t know – if you’re going to get all allegorical about it, I suppose you could say that the two Silk Spectres, especially when paired with Black Hood and Captain Metropolis, are some kind of gender theory / feminist dialogue. How the daughter deals with and constructs her mother is certainly a good example of this – especially with regard to that whole victim / lover debate…if that makes any sense?

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